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     City of Canyonville                                                    City Press Release

250 N Main, Canyonville, OR 97417
                                 Re: Water/Sewer Surcharge
         541-839-4258 or 541-839-4020
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Special Public Notices


IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR DRINKING WATER
City of Canyonville Water System Has Levels of Haloacetic Acids (HAA5)
Above Drinking Water Standards

Our water system recently violated a drinking water standard. Although this is not an emergency, as our customers, you have a right to know what happened, what you should do, and what we are doing to correct this situation.

We routinely monitor for the presence of drinking water contaminants. Testing results we received November 2015 show that our system exceeded the standard, or maximum contaminate level (MCL), for HAA5 at the time it was tested. The standard for HAA5 is 0.06 milligrams per liter. HAA5 was found at 0.181 mg/l.  It is noteworthy that the city’s results for the First Quarter of 2016 were well within compliance at 0.031 mg/l

Note: A milligram per liter represents one part in one million parts. The standard was exceeded by 0.0029 of one part, in a million parts. (To put this amount in perspective, a similar proportion would be 0.0029 of one cent in $10,000.)
 
What does this mean?

This is not an immediate risk. If it had been, you would have been notified immediately.  However, some people who drink water containing haloacetic acids in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk for cancer.

What should you do?

You do not need to use an alternative (e.g., bottled) water supply.  However, if you have specific health concerns, consult your doctor.

What happened?  What is being done?

FOR EXAMPLE;
      The violation was caused by a traditional water treatment technique used during periods of heavy leaf fall in the autumn, to remove coloration caused by leaves falling into the creek. While this technique is not harmful in itself, this type of violation may occur as a result. City staff are investigating a more modern treatment sub-system than our aging plant provides to correct this issue. We are working to have it operating before the fall period next year.
      Though this violation may not appear to be excessive, our customers have the right to know when violations occur and we are required by law to inform you.

A copy of this notice has been posted on the City Hall bulletin board. Additional copies are available at City Hall. A copy will be mailed to individual customers within 30 days.

For more information please contact Matt Giles at 541-580-7953.





Excerpt taken from CDC (Centers for Disease Control) website


 
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Sodium Hypochlorite Solution(SH)


FAQ about Sodium Hypochlorite Solution (SH)
12. What are disinfection by-products, and are they an issue in the SWS? expanded
Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are chemical compounds formed when chlorine is added to water with organic material in it. All natural waters have some organic material in them, and generally waters that are more turbid (dirty) have more organic material. DBPs are a concern whenever chlorine is added to drinking water, whether in the Safe Water System or in a large-scale water treatment plant in the United States, because some studies suggest that ingestion of DBPs in water over a lifetime may be associated with a very low risk of cancer. However, this risk is very small. In areas where many people, and many children, have diarrheal diseases caused by unsafe drinking water, the risk of cancer from DBPs is very small compared to the risk of death or stunting from diarrheal diseases. In their Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality, the World Health Organization states: "Where local circumstances require that a choice must be made between meeting either microbiological guidelines or guidelines for disinfectants or disinfectant by-products, the microbiological quality must always take precedence, and where necessary, a chemical guideline value can be adopted corresponding to a higher level of risk. Efficient disinfection must never be compromised" 2. For more information, please see our detailed page on DBPs.

http://www.cdc.gov/safewater/chlorination-faq.html
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